BOOK REVIEW: Unlimited access enriches Moneyball

For the savvy reader who knows how narratives are made and how they in turn make reputations, Michael Lewis' Moneyball is three stories in one.

For the savvy reader who knows how narratives are made and how they in turn make reputations, Michael Lewis' Moneyball is three stories in one.

First, there's the tale of the disappointing big league career of the highly touted Billy Beane. The second story tells how the washout finds a new role, as general manager of the Oakland A's, from which perch he shatters conventional wisdom as to how a team in a profoundly inequitable system should be run. The third story is one of access, and how vital it is to a story. It is clear from the behind-the-scenes details that make the book so vivid that Lewis, the author of Liar's Poker, had tremendous access to Beane and his staff. The result is a myth-making work from which Beane emerges as a dynamic, renegade character. Not just a book for baseball fans, this is an object lesson of how the gambles involved in the frightening prospect of allowing a sharp writer or reporter unlimited access to your client can sometimes lead to a reputation home run. ----- Title Moneyball Author Michael Lewis Publisher W.W. Norton & Co., 288 pages Reviewed by Matthew Creamer

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