BOOK REVIEW: Book doesn't heed its own solid advice

James Haggerty has included good information about handling PR during a lawsuit. For example, toward the end of his tome, he writes, "Whatever the final word count, divide it in half and make that the limit for the number of words you can use to get the message across."

James Haggerty has included good information about handling PR during a lawsuit. For example, toward the end of his tome, he writes, "Whatever the final word count, divide it in half and make that the limit for the number of words you can use to get the message across."

This book would have benefitted from following that advice. It's filled with what an old reporting professor of mine used to call "glittering generalities" about what makes lawyers, PR people, and reporters tick. Most of these do nothing but detract from what worthwhile information there is in this volume. There is good advice here on controlling messages during trials, something that often means reigning in lawyers and clients prone to put their feet in their mouths. And Haggerty is at his best describing political infighting, likely because of his years working in government. Skip his generalities and look for his bullet points and checklists, they can help in litigation PR efforts. Title In the Court of Public Opinion - Winning Your Case with Public Relations Author James Haggerty Publisher John Wiley & Sons, 288 pages

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