CASA unveils 'Family Day' PSAs as part of latest anti-drug initiative

WASHINGTON: The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University launched a nationwide campaign last week to publicize a new survey suggesting that teenagers who regularly eat dinner with their families are less likely to engage in substance abuse.

WASHINGTON: The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University launched a nationwide campaign last week to publicize a new survey suggesting that teenagers who regularly eat dinner with their families are less likely to engage in substance abuse.

Weber Shandwick is helping coordinate the long-term push on a pro bono basis.

The centerpiece of the campaign is President Bush's declaration that September 22, 2003 be known as "Family Day," a day for kids to eat dinner with their parents. In a statement accompanying the declaration, Bush hailed the CASA study for discovering that "teens from families who eat dinner together were less likely to use illegal drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, while teenagers who rarely eat dinner with the parents were more likely to engage in these unhealthy activities."

Word of Family Day will be spread primarily through a series of nationally televised PSAs, the first of which was unveiled at a press conference last Wednesday. The spot features Bush poking fun at his mother's cooking. His mother, former first lady Barbara Bush, also makes an appearance.

Other PSAs will include actress and CASA board member Jamie Lee Curtis. The campaign also uses radio spots, movie theater slides, and bus posters.

Campaign materials were de- signed by Interpublic Group ad agency Foote, Cone and Belding. Viacom and The Ad Council are providing distribution.

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