BOOK REVIEW: Much can be learned from 'The Children'

The Children tells the passionate story of the civil-rights movement through the eyes of the children who led by example and great courage.

The Children tells the passionate story of the civil-rights movement through the eyes of the children who led by example and great courage.

It recounts the initial sit-ins in Nashville, TN, and takes the reader to Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, and Little Rock, AK - the hot spots of the '60s.

The book shows how these children - most of whom were products of Tennessee's black universities - were taught non-violence and how they moved Martin Luther King to act at a faster pace than he would have on his own. It shows Jim Crow's inhumanity, the KKK's brutality, and the indifference of too many Americans. More than anything, however, it shows how children can make a difference. It shows how these young men and women moved a nation.

Having been a part of another social movement that was parallel to the civil-rights movement - the antiwar movement during the Vietnam era - I can relate to the children in this book and firmly believe incredible good can come from a noble cause.

Title The Children

Author David Halberstam

Publisher Ballantine Books (March 1999), 800 pages

Reviewed by Michael Lissauer, president of Business Wire

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.