Chevron pushes for dialogue on energy

SAN RAMON, CA: People are reminded every day of energy's global impact, whether it's the war in Iraq or filling up at the gas station.

SAN RAMON, CA: People are reminded every day of energy's global impact, whether it's the war in Iraq or filling up at the gas station.

With so much uncertainty about what the future of energy resources will look like, Chevron has launched a thought-leadership campaign to generate a dialogue on how to meet the world's energy needs.

The campaign comes on the heels of Chevron tweaking its brand. In May, the $155 billion company shortened its name from ChevronTexaco to clarify its image and reputation. The company wants to be seen as a single, integrated global energy company.

After numerous acquisitions over the years, the company's brand had become somewhat muddied. Research showed that the Chevron brand was better aligned with exploration and production.

"As we refreshed our corporate brand, we looked at where we wanted to go," said Russ Yarrow, manager of external relations. "And we wanted a really effective campaign that addressed the real issues in the energy industry."

And that campaign will mean fostering a dialogue about such issues as developing alternative energy sources, using energy more efficiently, and finding the best ways to develop the energy reserves already at our disposal, Yarrow added.

"These are issues that impact the business community at large, governments, and consumers," he said. "Everyone has a stake in this."

Chevron views this initiative as an integrated campaign that builds off of its corporate positioning efforts. From executive speeches to advertising to events, Chevron is focused on positioning itself as a thought-leader on these issues.

A key component of the campaign is a website Chevron has developed to facilitate the discussion of these issues.

At www.willyoujoinus.com, visitors will find a synopsis of the key factors driving the energy discussion, including energy demand and supply, population, geopolitics, and the environment.

Also on the site are community discussion boards on such topics as, "How can we make oil and gas supplies last longer as the search for other fuels continues?" Among those offering viewpoints are John Elkington, chairman of SustainAbility, and Jerry Taylor, director of natural resource studies at The Cato Institute.

Visitors are encouraged to join the discussion by posting their own comments.

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