Students boycott ’dirty’ companies

NEW YORK: A coalition of students from 50 US colleges have aimed their guns at corporate heavy-hitters Coca-Cola, General Motors and BP Amoco, starting a grass-roots PR campaign designed to discourage students nationwide from accepting ’dirty jobs’ with these and other companies they consider environmentally negligent.

NEW YORK: A coalition of students from 50 US colleges have aimed their guns at corporate heavy-hitters Coca-Cola, General Motors and BP Amoco, starting a grass-roots PR campaign designed to discourage students nationwide from accepting ’dirty jobs’ with these and other companies they consider environmentally negligent.

NEW YORK: A coalition of students from 50 US colleges have aimed

their guns at corporate heavy-hitters Coca-Cola, General Motors and BP

Amoco, starting a grass-roots PR campaign designed to discourage

students nationwide from accepting ’dirty jobs’ with these and other

companies they consider environmentally negligent.



Student representatives from Ivy League schools held a press conference

last Thursday in New York to explain the decision to use their schools’

prestigious names as a way of forcing corporate America to take

responsibility for their actions. ’This is a united movement to force

companies to realize that their environmental policies need to change,’

said Brooke Jack, a Princeton student.



Coke is taking the students’ threats seriously, meeting with a member of

the group (renamed Eco-Pledge this week) and attempting to combat the

allegations.



’We are concerned with the spread of misinformation,’ said Coca-Cola

manager of global communications Trey Paris.’



In the US alone, Coca-Cola spends dollars 2 billion on recycled

products, and we are working toward recycling solutions.’



Ford was taken off the student boycott list when it withdrew from the

Global Climate Coalition, an industry-funded lobbying group that the

students claim has pressured Congress to ignore global warming

concerns.



The students hope to have 100,000 boycott pledges by Earth Day 2000 on

April 22.



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