Comment: Corporate sites must court journos

Major corporations (and their PR mouthpieces) have gotten quite adept at prattling on about how information has replaced steel and oil as the most powerful asset in today’s economy. In today’s economy, he who has the most knowledge wins. And at least one aspect of the PRWeek/BSMG corporate survey reflects that, as 77.7% of respondents said the primary purpose of their corporate Web site was communication.

Major corporations (and their PR mouthpieces) have gotten quite adept at prattling on about how information has replaced steel and oil as the most powerful asset in today’s economy. In today’s economy, he who has the most knowledge wins. And at least one aspect of the PRWeek/BSMG corporate survey reflects that, as 77.7% of respondents said the primary purpose of their corporate Web site was communication.

Major corporations (and their PR mouthpieces) have gotten quite

adept at prattling on about how information has replaced steel and oil

as the most powerful asset in today’s economy. In today’s economy, he

who has the most knowledge wins. And at least one aspect of the

PRWeek/BSMG corporate survey reflects that, as 77.7% of respondents said

the primary purpose of their corporate Web site was communication.



But what is unconscionable, given the burgeoning importance of the

Internet as an information provider, is that only 36.3% of respondents

said they have a dedicated area for the media on their Web site. As the

Middleberg/Ross journalist survey (p15) shows, PR teams must make more

of an effort to convince journalists that their Web site contains more

than glowing bios and self-serving product spiel.



Are you listening, Corporate America? You’d better get a dedicated media

area on your Web site, because your competitor already has one. Why do

you think Microsoft has such an extensive online pressroom? Because not

a day goes by that Sun doesn’t take another potshot at the company. And

as crisis expert Larry Kamer says, if journalists don’t get the unbiased

information they need from your site, they’ll go elsewhere - advocacy

groups, your rival’s site, even hate sites. And don’t assume that what

they unearth won’t find its way into the story - 60% of journos in the

survey said they would consider reporting an Internet rumor if confirmed

by an independent source. And if you still don’t believe it, we have one

word for you: Monica.



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