Hillary marches into trouble with gay, lesbian voters

NEW YORK: In the wake of yet another PR gaffe from a campaign that has already seen more than its share, New York senate candidate Hillary Clinton struggled last week to deflect criticism by gays and lesbians about her decision to march in last week’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade - an event that has long excluded gay and lesbian groups.

NEW YORK: In the wake of yet another PR gaffe from a campaign that has already seen more than its share, New York senate candidate Hillary Clinton struggled last week to deflect criticism by gays and lesbians about her decision to march in last week’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade - an event that has long excluded gay and lesbian groups.

NEW YORK: In the wake of yet another PR gaffe from a campaign that

has already seen more than its share, New York senate candidate Hillary

Clinton struggled last week to deflect criticism by gays and lesbians

about her decision to march in last week’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade - an

event that has long excluded gay and lesbian groups.



The decision to participate in the Manhattan parade put Clinton in a

politically untenable position, having to choose between pleasing two

crucial voting blocs, Irish-Americans and gays and lesbians. After

accepting an invitation to march last December, she seemed to backpedal,

saying she would participate only if she had ’lots of good friends to

march with.’



Attempting to mollify the angered parties, the First Lady took part in

an alternative St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 5, organized by The

Green and Lavender Alliance, an Irish gay and lesbian group. The

first-time event was billed as the city’s only ’inclusive’ St. Patrick’s

parade.



However, the move did little to quell the gay and lesbian community’s

sense of betrayal. The Irish and Lesbian Gay Organization, a group that

has repeatedly sued for the right to march in the larger parade,

condemned Clinton for trying to ’have it both ways.’



’Marching in the Manhattan parade supports exclusion and homophobia,’ a

spokesperson wrote. ’Politicians with integrity will make their

positions clear.’



Clinton’s likely opponent in the New York senate race, mayor Rudy

Giuliani, also marched in the parade, as he has throughout his mayoral

tenure.



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