GM drops passwords from Web pages

WASHINGTON, DC: General Motors last week removed passwords for several pages on its US media Internet site, opening up the gates to anyone with Web access.

WASHINGTON, DC: General Motors last week removed passwords for several pages on its US media Internet site, opening up the gates to anyone with Web access.

WASHINGTON, DC: General Motors last week removed passwords for

several pages on its US media Internet site, opening up the gates to

anyone with Web access.



The move, which also eases site navigation, lets the general public view

historical material, product and motorsports show information and sales

and production data - pages previously available only to accredited

media.



GM director of communications Len Marsico said the company removed

passwords not only to provide the media with easier access, but also to

reduce administration costs. The site also has been redesigned to give

company news a position of greater prominence. Some pages, such as staff

contact numbers and media statements and advisories, remain

password-protected.



Even though 80% of GM’s press releases were always available on the

consumer site, Marsico said the removal of the passwords allows

consumers to choose whether they get their information from the media or

directly from the company - an important choice, he believes, given the

thirst for up-to-the-minute information by auto enthusiasts.



Marsico said that the Internet has enabled GM to do more global press

relations, releasing information simultaneously in seven languages. In

February, the GM site registered over 4,000 users, with 19% of them

originating from outside the US. GM’s foreign subsidiaries also have

sites that operate independently from the company’s Detroit base.



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