Tales from Tinseltown: Designers infect Oscar frenzy with an infomercial mentality

Now that Oscar madness has subsided for another year and journalists have recovered from the harrowing experience (I’m not kidding) of covering the marathon of parties and photo ops hosted by studios and fashion companies, I thought I’d hand out a few well-earned awards of my own.

Now that Oscar madness has subsided for another year and journalists have recovered from the harrowing experience (I’m not kidding) of covering the marathon of parties and photo ops hosted by studios and fashion companies, I thought I’d hand out a few well-earned awards of my own.

Now that Oscar madness has subsided for another year and

journalists have recovered from the harrowing experience (I’m not

kidding) of covering the marathon of parties and photo ops hosted by

studios and fashion companies, I thought I’d hand out a few well-earned

awards of my own.



Yes, some people may not be eager to pick up their certificate of merit

- or demerit. But bearing in mind that when it comes to the Oscars any

publicity is good publicity, I feel the publicists and others who’ve

lusted after Oscar gold should get recognized.



First, though, a few thoughts on why this particular Oscar night was the

least glamorous event Hollywood has held in a long, long time. Why?



Perhaps the fashion, beauty and accessory companies have taken all the

mystery and excitement out of the big night by issuing press releases

every five minutes regarding which celebrities are considering modeling

their wares. It’s all become one big infomercial.



Which leads me to another Oscar pet peeve: the criteria for celebrity

status has changed - and not for the better. Please, no more press

releases touting that your clothes are being worn by a nominee’s wife,

mother or husband!





The envelopes, please ...



Most Promising Newcomer: Jimmy Choo. The flacks for this footwear

company hosted a glam pre-Oscar tea party and managed to get their wares

on a lot of stars - and a surprising number of them made sure to tell

the press about their chic shoes.



The ’What Happened?’ Award: Pamela Dennis. The designer managed to get

her name and photo in virtually every pre-Oscar story, but didn’t snag

any major nominee or presenter.



Most Gratuitous Oscar PR campaign: Estee Lauder. The venerable cosmetic

house got into the Oscar race for the first time this year by taking a

suite at The Four Seasons Hotel offering pre-Oscar primping

services.



The suite was jammed with journalists (including Degen Pener from

Entertainment Weekly and, in the interest of full disclosure, yours

truly) who got their paws painted and sipped champagne while waiting for

massages.



Best Performance by a Designer: Randolph Duke. Besides Michael Caine,

he’s become the most ubiquitous man in Hollywood. He arrived on the arm

of Entertainment Tonight’s Julie Moran and scored an Oscar-night triumph

when Best Actress winner Hilary Swank took the stage in his dress.



So now it’s back to the drawing board for next year. In a town that

loves sequels, it’s comforting for publicists to know that redemption is

less than 12 short months away.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in