Models for measuring PR impact sought by CPRF, IPR

WASHINGTON, DC: In yet another attempt to measure the true impact of PR, the Institute for Public Relations Firms (IPR) and the Council of Public Relations Firms (CPRF) have launched an effort to develop better models for evaluating the efficacy of PR campaigns.

WASHINGTON, DC: In yet another attempt to measure the true impact of PR, the Institute for Public Relations Firms (IPR) and the Council of Public Relations Firms (CPRF) have launched an effort to develop better models for evaluating the efficacy of PR campaigns.

WASHINGTON, DC: In yet another attempt to measure the true impact

of PR, the Institute for Public Relations Firms (IPR) and the Council of

Public Relations Firms (CPRF) have launched an effort to develop better

models for evaluating the efficacy of PR campaigns.



At a symposium held last week, IPR president and CEO Jack Felton and

CPRF prexy Jack Bergen announced the launch of the PR Outcome Models

initiative.



The Council has pledged dollars 100,000 to fund the initiative’s first

year, and Wirthlin Worldwide has been retained to create and test

several models.



While larger agencies are well-equipped to handle their own evaluation

programs, the PR profession lacks the industrywide models that the

advertising industry has developed. Both Bergen and Felton believe that

this has cost the profession respect and made it more difficult to prove

the bottom-line worth of PR to C-level corporate executives.



Wirthlin has started collecting case studies (while keeping the names of

the participants confidential), examining strategies and tactics and

benchmarking the results. Ideally, Bergen said, the models will

’identify those strategies and tactics that are likely to prove

effective, even before you attempt a campaign.’



Felton and Bergen each cautioned that no quick fixes should be

expected.



Both also agreed that the models that are eventually created will need

constant updating to reflect changes in audiences, technology and

culture.



One major obstacle, Bergen believes, will be getting agencies and

companies to allow use of their case studies.



Bergen expressed hope that the models will force leading business

schools to take the discipline of PR more seriously - an essential first

step, he said, in increasing recognition of PR’s pivotal role in the

strategic decision-making process.



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