DIARY: Four thousand geeks miss ’Deep Space Nine’ for party

Back in school, they might have been stuffed into lockers, had their books knocked out of their arms and unwittingly walked around with ’Kick me’ signs taped to their back. But these days, it seems that geeks have come into their own.

Back in school, they might have been stuffed into lockers, had their books knocked out of their arms and unwittingly walked around with ’Kick me’ signs taped to their back. But these days, it seems that geeks have come into their own.

Back in school, they might have been stuffed into lockers, had

their books knocked out of their arms and unwittingly walked around with

’Kick me’ signs taped to their back. But these days, it seems that geeks

have come into their own.



To celebrate the fact that being a geek has become downright cool, 4,000

of the proudest gathered in Boston on March 31 and April 1 for the Geek

Pride Festival, sponsored by Andover.Net in association with VA Linux,

Addison-Wesley Professional and Switchhouse.



The festival was the brainchild of Tim McEachern, president of One World

Interactive Corp, who has crowned himself ’King of all Geeks.’ ’Geeks

rule the world, and we thought it was time to start throwing parties to

celebrate that,’ he explains.



The two-day festival included a swap party for fave geek music, games,

movies and books; a ’Stump the Geek’ trivia contest; the dramatic

presentation What Would Linus Do?; and lectures by high-profile geeks

like Slashdot founder Rob ’CmdrTaco’ Malda and Jon Katz, Slashdot editor

and author of Geeks: How Two Lost Boys Rode the Internet Out of Idaho.

There were, alas, no seminars on how to tolerate the shame of noogies

and wedgies.



McEachern said the festival may be repeated in San Francisco later this

year. Shouldn’t be too hard to turn up a geek or two there ...



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in