Corporate groups claim Earth Day

WASHINGTON, DC: Corporate America has changed its tune on Earth Day, now considering the event too important to allow the environmental movement to monopolize it.

WASHINGTON, DC: Corporate America has changed its tune on Earth Day, now considering the event too important to allow the environmental movement to monopolize it.

WASHINGTON, DC: Corporate America has changed its tune on Earth

Day, now considering the event too important to allow the environmental

movement to monopolize it.



To this end, the US Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of

Manufacturers (NAM) are spending the days leading up to the 30th

anniversary of Earth Day on April 22 tackling the perception that

economic growth equals more pollution. The two groups argue that growth

and new technologies are doing more to foster a cleaner environment than

are government regulations.



’One CD-ROM is the equivalent of 2,000 pounds of phone books,’ noted

Chamber VP for environmental and regulatory affairs Bill Kovacs.



But the two groups are also endeavoring to draw a line between

mainstream environmentalists and the movement’s more extreme elements by

issuing a small green book that collects some of the more controversial

statements made by environmental activists.



At a DC exhibit last week, NAM and 12 of its member associations

detailed the steps manufacturers have voluntarily taken to clean up

their act.



NAM assistant VP for communications and media relations Kerry Lynn

Schmit emphasized that the major thrust of the group’s PR push will be

in 50 local communities, where it will work to ’demonstrate the links

between innovation and growth for a clean environment.’ Events will

range from creek cleanups to school visits by environmental

engineers.



Meanwhile, regional chambers of commerce are being sent press kits,

talking points and sample speeches. A major goal in the chamber’s

strategy is to focus on the local media.



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