Bhopal Group seeks NY-based PR firm

LONDON: The Bhopal Action Group is looking for a New York-based PR firm to help in its renewed fight for victims of the 1985 environmental catastrophe at a Union Carbide plant in India.

LONDON: The Bhopal Action Group is looking for a New York-based PR firm to help in its renewed fight for victims of the 1985 environmental catastrophe at a Union Carbide plant in India.

LONDON: The Bhopal Action Group is looking for a New York-based PR

firm to help in its renewed fight for victims of the 1985 environmental

catastrophe at a Union Carbide plant in India.



The new push comes after Goodkind Labaton Rudoff & Sucharow, a US law

firm, identified a provision in US tort law that allows a US company to

be sued for actions committed abroad if they constitute a violation of

human rights. A federal class action suit was filed in US district court

against Union Carbide and former chairman Warren Anderson in November

1999 by Kenneth McCallion, a New York attorney for the victims.



Union Carbide paid dollars 470 million in a 1989 settlement after at

least 3,000 people died and 20,000 were left sick. At the time, the

settlement was criticized as woefully inadequate, as only a fraction of

those who sued for damages are understood to have received

compensation.



The Bhopal Action Group is looking for PR counsel to fight the might of

Union Carbide and its army of lawyers and PR experts. ’It’s a David and

Goliath story,’ said Indra Sinha, one of the founders of the Bhopal

Medical Appeal. ’We’re playing in the big leagues.’



The group was in New York last week to attend the opening of Bhopal

Express, a new movie set in Bhopal at the time of the disaster. The

movie is described as an ’Indian Titanic’ - a love story set amidst the

tragedy of the 1985 chemical spill.



Representatives are said to be talking to a number of crisis experts,

including Rubenstein Associates president Howard Rubenstein, whose

Indian clients include the billionaire Khemka Family. Rubenstein also

represented the late Indian Prime Minister, Rajiv Ghandi.



Another contender is John Scanlon, the crisis expert who provided PR

counsel for a Sudanese pharmaceutical factory owner whose plant was

bombed by the US government in 1998 in response to embassy attacks.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in