Washington riots obscure IMF’s attempted PR push

WASHINGTON, DC: The World Bank and International Monetary Fund meetings in Washington last week were designed by their organizers as something of a PR ’coming out’ for the institutions, which have long been shrouded in mystery. But much like the World Trade Organization summit in Seattle last year, protesters seized the headlines, leaving the IMF’s agenda almost completely obscured from public view.

WASHINGTON, DC: The World Bank and International Monetary Fund meetings in Washington last week were designed by their organizers as something of a PR ’coming out’ for the institutions, which have long been shrouded in mystery. But much like the World Trade Organization summit in Seattle last year, protesters seized the headlines, leaving the IMF’s agenda almost completely obscured from public view.

WASHINGTON, DC: The World Bank and International Monetary Fund

meetings in Washington last week were designed by their organizers as

something of a PR ’coming out’ for the institutions, which have long

been shrouded in mystery. But much like the World Trade Organization

summit in Seattle last year, protesters seized the headlines, leaving

the IMF’s agenda almost completely obscured from public view.



While Manning, Selvage & Lee SVP Brian Gaudet credited the DC

Metropolitan Police Department with having handled protesters better

than Seattle’s force - whose violent overreaction created intense media

scrutiny - Institute for Policy Studies executive director John Cavanagh

said that the riot footage helped tilt the scale towards IMF and World

Bank critics.



This rendered IMF’s stated goal of being more transparent in its

operations almost impossible. Cavanagh said he believes the problem is

that the organization’s mission is highly technical and, for all intents

and purposes, directed at policy-making elites.



Wirthlin Worldwide VP Mike Dabadie suggested that none of the protest

groups, which included conservative Pat Buchanan disciples, labor unions

and young anarchists, were 100% on target with their message

strategy.



Confrontational demonstrators, Dabadie said, do not connect emotionally

with older citizens.



He added that pro-globalization messages used by companies and

institutions often fail to connect with Americans, as the focus is often

on how trade benefits other countries.



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