TALES FROM TINSELTOWN - As long as the kids stay quiet, bad reviews can’t kill Dinosaur

I went to a tent revival the other day. The message was powerful, the spirit was moved, the house was rockin’.

I went to a tent revival the other day. The message was powerful, the spirit was moved, the house was rockin’.

I went to a tent revival the other day. The message was powerful,

the spirit was moved, the house was rockin’.



And the rain fell down ... from Bruce Springsteen’s sweat-laden

shirt.



If you haven’t yet seen the Boss and his band, get thee to an arena

immediately.



If not sooner. And that’s all I’m going to say about that.



Now, to the business at hand.



You can’t lose with dinosaurs. You just can’t. Kids have a fascination

with them, which seems to hold through adulthood.



Disney’s new animated feature, smartly named after the lizards

themselves (though one paleontologist recently said some dinos were

warm-blooded), made a T-Rex-size dollars 38 million during its opening

weekend. I was not in any of those theaters, but I bet they were

swarming with little tykes.



And their parents.



Kids don’t read reviews, so the critics’ harsh comments mattered

not.



Roger Ebert’s thumb may as well be in his mouth, for all they care.

Parents, of course, think any movie that engages their children long

enough to prevent them from performing somersaults down the aisle or

picking a fight with their siblings is Oscar-worthy.



Most of the negative comments were directed at the film’s dialogue. One

critic even said the words spoken by the creatures were ’unrealistic.’

As if anyone really knows what talking dinosaurs would say.



’I hope when they make movies about us millions of years from now, they

won’t have me spouting double negatives with a Brooklyn accent,’ sighs

the triceratops to the T-Rex. ’I think of myself as Lower East

Side.’



’Well, and I’m sure to be typecast as the heavy,’ groans the Rex.

’Nobody wants to see me in a light romantic comedy.’



The writer credited with co-penning the film’s dialogue is John Harrison

(director of Tales from the Darkside: The Movie). I’ve worked with him

and happen to think he is a good writer. The affable Harrison has

shrugged off the barbs, knowing audiences (the ones who must actually

pay money to see the show) are the critics who matter most.



Thirty-eight million dollars speaks loudly. Successful box-office is the

greatest PR in the industry. It assures that Harrison is no

Dino-sore-loser. He did his job and satisfied the audience. In the

battle of perception, he wins. He gave us likable - and profitable -

lizard-speak.



As the Boss would say, we all need just a little of that dinosaur touch.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in