Do you have what it takes? PR success test unveiled

NEW YORK: Hoping to give a better answer to the elusive question ’What does it take to make it in PR?,’ Empowerment Concepts has developed a personality assessment test for would-be PR practitioners.

NEW YORK: Hoping to give a better answer to the elusive question ’What does it take to make it in PR?,’ Empowerment Concepts has developed a personality assessment test for would-be PR practitioners.

NEW YORK: Hoping to give a better answer to the elusive question

’What does it take to make it in PR?,’ Empowerment Concepts has

developed a personality assessment test for would-be PR

practitioners.



The assessment tool, created at the behest of the Council of Public

Relations Firms (PR Week, May 29), was developed by testing top industry

pros in order to determine which personality traits portend future

success in PR. Among the qualities identified as important were

self-confidence, stamina, the ability to derive ego gratification from

influencing others and a dislike of rules.



The CPRF, which charged the San Francisco-based Empowerment Concepts

with developing the assessment tool, plans to encourage firms to use the

tool for screening potential job candidates. The council would not

reveal which candidates were used to develop the test.



According to Empowerment Concepts, top PR performers ’tend to be

impulsive decision-makers ... these people are willing to trust their

instincts and take action without a strong need for all of the

’details.’’



A trait top PR performers seem to lack, however, is an ability to follow

through on every commitment: the mean score in the area of ’personal

responsibility’ was only 44%. ’People who score lower in this measure

tend to be selective in the commitments that they follow through on,

sometimes failing to be dependable,’ the testing company wrote in its

report to the CPRF.



Top performers also don’t like limitations, racking up a mean score

below 20% in the category of ’sensitivity to rules and guidelines.’



’They are innovative, tend to use their know-how in new and expanded

ways and find the routine associated with compliance to processes and

guidelines frustrating,’ the company found.



And while PR’s top minds are able to put in 15-hour days, they scored

low in the category of ’self-discipline.’ ’They can multi-task and see

change as a competitive tool,’ Empowerment Concepts reported. ’On the

flip side, they may have difficulty bringing all the detail that they

juggle to a successful conclusion.’



Given these and other personality traits, top PR pros may have

difficulty training others to succeed in the business: ’These are

action-oriented people with little patience for process or for people

who approach work differently than they do.’



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