PR pros clash over Madonna cybertheft

NEW YORK: Music PR pros clashed last week over whether the cybertheft of a new Madonna song really happened or was merely a component of a carefully orchestrated publicity campaign.

NEW YORK: Music PR pros clashed last week over whether the cybertheft of a new Madonna song really happened or was merely a component of a carefully orchestrated publicity campaign.

NEW YORK: Music PR pros clashed last week over whether the

cybertheft of a new Madonna song really happened or was merely a

component of a carefully orchestrated publicity campaign.



The title track of Madonna’s upcoming album, Music, found its way onto

several unauthorized Web sites earlier this month, prompting cries of

outrage from the Material Girl’s camp. As part of a story about the

alleged piracy, MTV.com posted a segment of the song on its Web

site.



Though Warner Bros., Madonna’s record company, quickly dashed off a

notice threatening legal action against sites that posted the song, many

pros remained suspicious. ’The only way these things happen anymore is

if it’s an inside job,’ said one.



Nasty Little Man founder Steve Martin, whose music publicity shop has

hyped the Beastie Boys and Robbie Williams, suggested that complaining

about bootlegged music is a sure-fire way to generate attention. ’People

accuse labels of doing it all the time,’ he said. ’But it creates buzz -

and if the track is good, who cares?’



Martin added that music publicists should attempt to accommodate the

delivery of new music via the Web, and singled out companies who refuse

to give reporters early copies of new releases for fear that the music

will find its way onto the Internet. ’Some people are insecure,’ he

explained.



’They want reporters to sign non-disclosure agreements and sit in their

office to listen to the music. They need to change with the changing

times.’



Madonna’s Music album and second child are both due in September.



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