DC firms predict elections will yield healthcare boom

WASHINGTON, DC: Though the November elections are still months away, the healthcare practices of DC’s biggest PR firms are already predicting that a new president and Congress will bring about a healthy 2001 for their ledgers.

WASHINGTON, DC: Though the November elections are still months away, the healthcare practices of DC’s biggest PR firms are already predicting that a new president and Congress will bring about a healthy 2001 for their ledgers.

WASHINGTON, DC: Though the November elections are still months

away, the healthcare practices of DC’s biggest PR firms are already

predicting that a new president and Congress will bring about a healthy

2001 for their ledgers.



Manning Selvage & Lee DC director of strategic and creative development

Brian Gaudet said that while accomplishments in healthcare policy over

the last few years have been incremental, the firm ’expects to see a lot

of action on health policy after Election Day.’



Already, he added, PR agencies are attempting to choreograph

partnerships between healthcare/pharmaceutical clients and third-party

associations.



Once the new Congress and president are installed, such partnerships may

well prove essential in order to successfully advance a legislative

agenda.



The increased interest in healthcare policy is likely to spur changes in

the healthcare arms of DC agencies - thus exacerbating an already tight

market for top healthcare voices. Gaudet, who expects to hire more than

a few healthcare staffers within the next six months, said smart PR

agencies will look toward the Clinton administration and Congress for

possible hires. MS&L has already transferred its national health policy

director, Mark Senak, from New York to DC.



However, Tom Beall, co-director of Ogilvy’s global health and medical

care practice, is cautious about forecasting how much will actually be

accomplished legislatively in health policy next year. But Beall said

that Ogilvy’s DC office is attempting to further strengthen the bond

between healthcare and public affairs - in part because the substantive

issues underlying legislation, such as a ’patients’ bill of rights’ and

Medicare prescription drug coverage, are likely to remain unresolved in

the near future.



Shandwick is among the other big agencies looking to up its healthcare

muscle. Public Affairs president David Krawitz predicted a large

increase in demand for health policy PR over the next year, and plans to

hire accordingly.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in