Gore grabs Dach as convention advisor

WASHINGTON, DC: Lagging behind George W. Bush in the polls and desperately in need of momentum, Al Gore has turned to Edelman vice-chair and DC general manager Leslie Dach to frame his messages for next week’s Democratic National Convention.

WASHINGTON, DC: Lagging behind George W. Bush in the polls and desperately in need of momentum, Al Gore has turned to Edelman vice-chair and DC general manager Leslie Dach to frame his messages for next week’s Democratic National Convention.

WASHINGTON, DC: Lagging behind George W. Bush in the polls and

desperately in need of momentum, Al Gore has turned to Edelman

vice-chair and DC general manager Leslie Dach to frame his messages for

next week’s Democratic National Convention.



Dach, whose official title is special advisor for the convention

program, will be responsible for helping establish a consistent thematic

tone as well as choosing the right speakers. In doing so, he plans to

counter the practiced sincerity that characterized the GOP bash in

Philadelphia last week.



’The Republican convention conveyed a misleading impression of the GOP,’

he explained, pointing to the party’s supposed emphasis on inclusiveness

and moderation. ’We will hear from a lot of real Americans who have been

positively impacted by Al Gore’s policies and about where he wants to

take the country.’



Dach has set two major goals for the convention: to establish Gore as a

leader in his own right and to highlight the battles he has fought - in

Vietnam as well as in Congress. Just as important will be expounding

upon Gore’s cornerstone issues, such as the environment, healthcare and

crime. ’(Gore) has played a role in these already, but has a strong

vision moving forward,’ Dach said.



Scheduled to speak on Gore’s behalf are people who have benefited from

the ’prosperity and progress’ that marked the Clinton administration’s

eight years. Even GOP backer Chris Wilson, president and COO of

Shandwick-owned research arm SWR Worldwide, conceded that this is a

savvy strategy.



’It’s a smart move from a PR standpoint,’ he said. ’Average people

relate to average people. The more that Al Gore can convince the public

that the success of the last eight years is attributable to the Clinton

administration, the better it will be for him.’



Still, Wilson questioned the wisdom of showcasing speakers such as Teddy

Kennedy and Jesse Jackson, who have been polarizing figures in the

past.



Image-conscious organizers of the GOP convention avoided giving

high-profile speaking roles to the party’s more controversial members in

Philadelphia.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in