PR Play of the Week: Hows about Dem apples, huh Mac?

If you were watching the Democratic National Pep Rally last week, you probably noticed the gaggle of Apple iMacs scattered purposefully about the convention floor. That’s because the Dems want you to know that they are the hi-tech party, the party of the future and, if you know anything about the history of the iMac, the party of very little RAM and no internal disk drive.

If you were watching the Democratic National Pep Rally last week, you probably noticed the gaggle of Apple iMacs scattered purposefully about the convention floor. That’s because the Dems want you to know that they are the hi-tech party, the party of the future and, if you know anything about the history of the iMac, the party of very little RAM and no internal disk drive.

If you were watching the Democratic National Pep Rally last week,

you probably noticed the gaggle of Apple iMacs scattered purposefully

about the convention floor. That’s because the Dems want you to know

that they are the hi-tech party, the party of the future and, if you

know anything about the history of the iMac, the party of very little

RAM and no internal disk drive.



So it is that Apple, the ’70s brainchild of Jobs and Wozniak, wins our

PR Play of the Week. Not only did Apple invade one of our most hallowed

national traditions, it revolutionized it.



At the first convention, 168 years ago, Andrew Jackson was nominated by

delegates casting their votes with handwritten ballots - and that’s how

it had been done ever since.



But this year it was done on 56 brand-new DV Special Edition iMacs

Additionally, all convention speakers were required to conduct an

Internet chat immediately following their speech - as long as their name

didn’t end in ’Clinton.’



And the Apple-fest didn’t stop at the Staples Center door, either.

Robert F. Kennedy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Cesar Chavez, Martin

Luther King, Jr. and a giant Apple logo all peered out from a mural

looming several stories above the LA horizon. The ad stood smartly

across the street from the hall, reminding the departing delegates, TV

audiences (the mural was a favorite of network news cameras) and even

the hapless, handcuffed protesters to ’Think Different.’



Alas, Apple reps were reluctant to toot their own horn. ’We don’t really

want to talk about how this came about,’ said corporate PR manager Lynn

Fox. ’But we are always delighted to assist both Democrats and

Republicans, especially when it involves highlighting the best and most

creative aspects of the human spirit.’





Nominations for PR Play of the Week should be sent to news@prweekus.com.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in