Philly capitalizes on GOP presence

PHILADELPHIA: In the wake of the recent GOP convention in Philadelphia, the city is attempting to parlay its successful stint as host into more tangible economic and image benefits.

PHILADELPHIA: In the wake of the recent GOP convention in Philadelphia, the city is attempting to parlay its successful stint as host into more tangible economic and image benefits.

PHILADELPHIA: In the wake of the recent GOP convention in

Philadelphia, the city is attempting to parlay its successful stint as

host into more tangible economic and image benefits.



’For a lot of people, it’s the end, but for those of us in the business,

this is a jumping-off point,’ said Sue Schwenderman, director of

communications at the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau. The

day after the convention, the bureau’s sales staff began talking up the

convention’s success by calling meeting planners - particularly those on

the verge of deciding whether to hold their events in Philadelphia.



Along with the myriad convention details, perhaps the city’s greatest

victory was handling the expected hordes of protesters. On the

convention’s second day, groups as small as 30 and as large as 300

paralyzed key intersections, spray-painted police cars and set fire to

banners welcoming convention attendees. But in sharp contrast to the

Philly police department’s high-profile beating of a carjacking suspect

on July 12, police officers neutralized the guerilla offensive in a

matter of hours.



Police commissioner John Timoney, who was on bike patrol during the

confrontation, stumbled upon protestors who were attempting to overturn

a car and sustained minor injuries. On the news that evening, the car’s

owner commended the commissioner.



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