California issues an RFP for dollars 10m campaign to promote recycling

SACRAMENTO: The California Department of Conservation has issued an RFP for a dollars 10 million social marketing contract designed to raise the state’s beverage container recycling rate from the current 74% to 80% by January 1, 2002.

SACRAMENTO: The California Department of Conservation has issued an RFP for a dollars 10 million social marketing contract designed to raise the state’s beverage container recycling rate from the current 74% to 80% by January 1, 2002.

SACRAMENTO: The California Department of Conservation has issued an

RFP for a dollars 10 million social marketing contract designed to raise

the state’s beverage container recycling rate from the current 74% to

80% by January 1, 2002.



According to Don Drysdale, an official in the department’s public

affairs office, the state is looking for anyone involved in social

marketing - be it a PR firm, integrated agency or a team composed of

representatives from other types of consultancies.



’We’re simply trying to change the behavior of consumers,’ Drysdale

explained.



’We look to the communications experts to tell us the best way to

achieve this.’



Drysdale noted that more than 40 agencies signed up to pitch for the

business at the mandatory bidder’s conference on July 27. Among the

attendees were Deen+Black, Hill & Knowlton, Manning Selvage & Lee,

Goddard-Clausen/Porter Novelli, Rogers & Associates and

Fleishman-Hillard.



’This proposal has been characterized as a ’pure social marketing

contract,’ which means that PR traditionally gets a heavy share of those

funds,’ added Alicia Ritter of Deen+Black, which is teaming up on the

pitch with Ogilvy’s Los Angeles outpost and Glass/McClure

Advertising.



From the pool of written presentations returned by August 23, the

conservation department will select a number of teams to give oral

presentations during the week of September 5. The state will make its

final decision on October 1, and work on the new contract will likely

begin in November.



With the current recycling rate hovering at 74% - down from a high of

82% in 1992 - California officials have become increasingly concerned

about the rising amount of glass, cans and plastic bottles in state

landfills.



The state has just 18 months to spend the federal funds, according to

Drysdale.



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