THINKPIECE: Management success - know yourself, share yourself and aspire to become a humble leader

Another one walked out the door. With him, dollars 25,000 in recruitment fees, dollars 3,000 in relocation expenses and a dollars 31,000 learning curve went down the drain. Clients became uneasy, employee morale suffered, and my firm’s ability to recruit top talent was negatively impacted.

Another one walked out the door. With him, dollars 25,000 in recruitment fees, dollars 3,000 in relocation expenses and a dollars 31,000 learning curve went down the drain. Clients became uneasy, employee morale suffered, and my firm’s ability to recruit top talent was negatively impacted.

Another one walked out the door. With him, dollars 25,000 in

recruitment fees, dollars 3,000 in relocation expenses and a dollars

31,000 learning curve went down the drain. Clients became uneasy,

employee morale suffered, and my firm’s ability to recruit top talent

was negatively impacted.



My management style was costing my firm money, and it was exacting an

emotional toll on me. Taking each departure personally, I was beginning

to feel like a failure.



Like so many young managers, I had been bumped up because I was a good

producer. No one considered that production and management require two

different skill sets, and those skill sets are often at odds with one

another. Totally ill equipped for my new role, I continued to make

mistake after mistake.



It wasn’t until I looked at myself that I got it. First, I had tried to

control my employees. Then, I had tried to motivate them. But I didn’t

become a good manager until I sought to inspire them. It was a principle

so simple that I had missed it.



Good management is grounded in intention; it’s not built on behavior

modification, manipulation or motivation. Instead of searching for the

right words and actions to produce desired behaviors, I put my

employees’ needs first and care about them as people.



Good management is not linear. Like the imagination, it’s fluid,

flexible and creative. I found no set rules to becoming a good manager,

but I discovered three principles that helped me grow into

management.



Good managers know themselves. They know their strengths and weaknesses,

and they understand their management styles.



Good managers share themselves as well as their knowledge. When I train

executives in presentation skills, I encourage them to be

themselves.



The best presenters are those who share with audiences, and good

managers are no different.



Sharing our souls does not mean becoming intimate friends with

employees.



It does mean, however, allowing employees access to our lives.



Good management is servant leadership. At its simplest, servant

leadership recognizes great leaders are humble servants. My job was not

to do the job, but to get the job done right, and that meant ensuring my

people had the tools, training, encouragement and trust they needed. By

serving them, I met my goals.



Few are born great managers. But these three principles - know yourself,

share yourself and practice servant leadership - helped me become a

better one.



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