Dems’ communication strategy is a hit

LOS ANGELES: Two weeks after the Democrats gaveled their convention to a close, the election landscape has shifted dramatically due in large part to an artfully executed communications strategy.

LOS ANGELES: Two weeks after the Democrats gaveled their convention to a close, the election landscape has shifted dramatically due in large part to an artfully executed communications strategy.

LOS ANGELES: Two weeks after the Democrats gaveled their convention

to a close, the election landscape has shifted dramatically due in large

part to an artfully executed communications strategy.



While the GOP preached to the choir of committed party faithful at its

recent shindig, the Dems had to convert skeptics in the hall and in the

media into true believers. Did they succeed? Democrats claim that Al

Gore has never looked more comfortable in his own skin and boast that

George W. Bush appears mired in malapropisms that undermine the

leadership profile he gained at the convention.



The strategy challenged the notion that striking a single defining note

and sticking with it (’It’s the economy, stupid’) may not be the best

way to play to apathetic voters.



Joe Andrew, national chairman of the Democratic National Committee, told

PRWeek that his party intentionally focused on the parochial. ’We’re

about customized campaigns and delivering information to individual

households on the issues they talk about around their kitchen table,’ he

said.



Parading 247 speakers to the podium over four days may have baffled the

media, but it successfully produced reams of media coverage for the

Democrats.



Even the GOP concedes that the Dems’ communications plan rallied

delegates in the hall and effectively inoculated the party against

abysmal TV ratings.



By contrast, the Bush campaign coasted in the lead for several months on

the theme ’changing the tone in Washington,’ a strategy played out with

a parade of ethnic speakers at the GOP convention. While it produced

colorful photo-ops and soundbites, it was not able to hide the fact that

Bush’s speech failed to deliver policy specifics.



Asked to comment, Bush spokesperson Ari Fleischer responded, ’I just

can’t deal with impressions’ and suggested a line-by-line comparison of

the policy proposals of the two candidates.



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