PR Play of the Week - Major-league PR for Clymer's book

The presidential election is only a week away, but two very clear winners have already emerged: Adam Clymer - The New York Times reporter and target of Bush's major-league assailment in September - and his fortunate publisher, HarperCollins.

The presidential election is only a week away, but two very clear winners have already emerged: Adam Clymer - The New York Times reporter and target of Bush's major-league assailment in September - and his fortunate publisher, HarperCollins.

The presidential election is only a week away, but two very clear winners have already emerged: Adam Clymer - The New York Times reporter and target of Bush's major-league assailment in September - and his fortunate publisher, HarperCollins.

Regardless of which candidate ends up in the White House, the reputations of both have been besmirched. Gore? The man could now become a roadie for Rage Against the Machine and still be considered a tool of the establishment.

And Bush has done more to take the heat off Dan Quayle than the guy who canceled Murphy Brown.

But Clymer, who has covered more administrations than most men his age have voted for, accepted his brush with fame with a subtle mix of humor and stoicism - in a word, with class. Now HarperCollins is employing those qualities for its release of the paperback version of Clymer's 1999 book, Edward M. Kennedy: A Biography.

The pitch letter reads: 'The media wants to talk to him about being called a 'major-league ...' Clymer wants to talk about the presidential campaign,' thereby capitalizing on the nastiness while simultaneously distancing Clymer from it.

Justin Loeber, director of publicity for the publishing house, said it would have been easy to exploit Clymer's new-found fame, but HarperCollins chose to take a slightly loftier stance. 'Adam's not crazy about bringing up his 15 minutes. He's turned down T-shirt offers and Letterman. A publicist's job is to anticipate what the media wants from your client and what your client wants.'

Therefore, our PR Play of The Week goes to HarperCollins for capitalizing on an awkward situation - with class.

And if you doubted Clymer's sincerity, know that he wisely refused repeated interview requests for this article.



Nominations for PR Play of the Week should be sent to news@prweekus.com.



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