NIH still accepting RFPs; expected to hire 15-24 firms by year's end

WASHINGTON: A staggering 440 firms have contacted the National Institutes of Health about its RFP for services. The total campaign, valued at up to dollars 250 million over five years, is one of the government's largest public information and communications efforts.

WASHINGTON: A staggering 440 firms have contacted the National Institutes of Health about its RFP for services. The total campaign, valued at up to dollars 250 million over five years, is one of the government's largest public information and communications efforts.

WASHINGTON: A staggering 440 firms have contacted the National Institutes of Health about its RFP for services. The total campaign, valued at up to dollars 250 million over five years, is one of the government's largest public information and communications efforts.

Partly to cope with the unexpected workload, the date for submitting responses to the RFP is now November 14, approximately two months later than the original date. Anthony Revenis, NIH contract specialist, said another reason for the delay is that people inside NIH and at outside firms suggested changes that he thought were appropriate.

Interested firms will have to show how, in terms of staff and cost, they would handle one of five sample tasks. Companies can also submit a proposal for a specific 'task order' on how they would rewrite two brochures - one on dental disease and the other on oral cancer. The winner of this task order will be the first firm chosen under the RFP. According to Revenis, the award may be made by mid-December.

In total, NIH plans to hire between 15 and 24 firms to provide the agency with expertise that runs the gamut from public relations to social marketing research, editorial support for publications and Web work. Many of the firms expressing interest in a portion of the business are Web designers, said Revenis.

Half of all the awards will go to small, disadvantaged and socioeconomic businesses.



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