Lobby ban is lifted as Clinton departs

WASHINGTON: President Clinton ended his final year in office with the repeal of an executive order he had signed just hours after taking office.

WASHINGTON: President Clinton ended his final year in office with the repeal of an executive order he had signed just hours after taking office.

WASHINGTON: President Clinton ended his final year in office with the repeal of an executive order he had signed just hours after taking office.

The order prohibited all senior White House officials and heads of top agencies from lobbying their ex-colleagues for five years after leaving their jobs. The ban reverts to a single year, as imposed by a 1978 law.

While public watchdog groups criticized the repeal as proof that the Clinton order was little more than political grandstanding, DC lobbying firms looked forward to the freedom it would give.

Joel Marin, principal of lobbying firm The Wexler Group, explained: 'People coming out of administrations are made more attractive because of the lack of limitations on them.'

However, Mark Wertheimer, president of Democracy 21, a public policy and lobbying group dedicated to closing the 'revolving door' between lobbyists and government officials, criticized not just the repeal of the order, but the order itself.

'They put in place this five-year limitation and then repealed it just as it could have had impact. The revolving door is a serious problem in this city and Clinton has turned it into an area to play games with.'



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in