42% now measure their reputations

NEW YORK: A growing number of companies use a formal system to gauge their reputation, according to Hill & Knowlton's latest survey of more than 600 CEOs and top managers.

NEW YORK: A growing number of companies use a formal system to gauge their reputation, according to Hill & Knowlton's latest survey of more than 600 CEOs and top managers.

NEW YORK: A growing number of companies use a formal system to gauge their reputation, according to Hill & Knowlton's latest survey of more than 600 CEOs and top managers.

The third annual Corporate Reputation Watch Survey was conducted by Yankelovich Partners and published in Chief Executive magazine. It found that two out of five companies surveyed - roughly 42% - have a formal measure in place to judge their reputation. The figure increased by 23 percentage points in two years, from 19% in 1998.

Tom Hoog, president and CEO of H&K USA, said he thinks CEOs will increasingly make reputation monitoring a priority. He predicted that future boards will demand that CEOs be formal guardians of corporate reputation.

'A company's reputation is more and more important to moving product, attracting top talent, resolving a crisis situation, integrating a company into a community and having impact in the public policy debate,' he said.

The most popular methods of measuring corporate reputation by CEOs surveyed are informal feedback and custom research. Some 37% of respondents said the latter was the most reliable way to measure reputation.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in