Microsoft split again, this time on its image

NEW YORK: The importance of corporate reputation has won Microsoft an unusual accolade: it is the company that the general public would most like to see run the government.

NEW YORK: The importance of corporate reputation has won Microsoft an unusual accolade: it is the company that the general public would most like to see run the government.

NEW YORK: The importance of corporate reputation has won Microsoft an unusual accolade: it is the company that the general public would most like to see run the government.

In the survey, conducted by Brouillard Communications, Microsoft beat out the likes of IBM, General Motors and General Electric for the honor.

The results found that despite the government's antitrust case against Microsoft, the Redmond, WA-based software giant was cited most often by respondents because of its 'can-do' spirit and its innovative corporate culture.

But just as Bill Clinton split the country down the middle, so did Microsoft.

The same survey also ranked it the firm least wanted at the helm of the White House.

Brouillard posed the hypothetical question to 1,022 adults in the US and 1,007 adults in the UK in January, in an attempt to highlight differing cultural attitudes towards corporations.

British respondents voted Richard Branson's airlines-to-vodka firm Virgin as most preferred to gain the keys to the prime minister's London residence at 10 Downing Street.

While Americans placed most emphasis on corporate character, UK respondents placed roughly twice as much importance on performance.

UK respondents believed that Virgin delivered on time and with a smile, and 39% said they chose Virgin because of its 'corporate character.'

George McGrath, managing director of Brouillard, said the message PR executives should take from the survey is that both performance and character count. 'How people view your company is a matter of both doing well and acting well,' he said.

Brouillard Communications, owned by WPP, is a PR and advertising firm specializing in corporate reputation issues.



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