Digital Think drops Burson citing different PR needs

SAN FRANCISCO: Digital Think, a leader in the hot 'e-learning,' or online professional training sector, has dropped Burson-Marsteller as US agency of record and placed its domestic PR account up for review.

SAN FRANCISCO: Digital Think, a leader in the hot 'e-learning,' or online professional training sector, has dropped Burson-Marsteller as US agency of record and placed its domestic PR account up for review.

SAN FRANCISCO: Digital Think, a leader in the hot 'e-learning,' or online professional training sector, has dropped Burson-Marsteller as US agency of record and placed its domestic PR account up for review.

The loss of the account further erodes Burson's tech expertise. Other big names in the sector have recently reviewed out of the agency, including SGI and Sun Microsystems.

According to Digital Think's director of corporate communications, Derek Gordon, the tech firm ended its relationship with Burson early last month for several reasons.

'Burson did a great job for us up until and through our IPO a year ago, but its San Francisco tech practice took a big hit last September with lots of turnover, and we weren't getting the kinds of results we had in the past,' he explained.

Gordon also noted that the company had different PR needs today as a public company versus as a start-up, and was looking to lower its PR agency budget accordingly.

'We were spending somewhere around dollars 65,000 a month through the IPO, and now we're looking at spending about dollars 25,000, which makes sense for our company life cycle,' he explained.

Gordon said he has extended RFPs for his US corporate account to about a dozen PR agencies and hopes to have a new agency on board by April 1.

'The assignment will have a corporate and brand focus, and I also hope to increase the profile of our CEO,' said Gordon.

Burson's London office will continue to handle Digital Think's European PR business.

The loss of the US account is another blow to Burson's San Francisco branch, which is still reeling from the decision by Sun last month to put its multi-million-dollar account up for review. Very few top-name tech clients now remain on its roster.



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