BF Goodrich to drop 'BF' in a bid to move away from outdated image

CHARLOTTE, NC: BF Goodrich will spend up to dollars 3 million this year on a corporate identity program to publicize its name change. As of June 1, the company plans to drop the BF and be known simply as Goodrich.

CHARLOTTE, NC: BF Goodrich will spend up to dollars 3 million this year on a corporate identity program to publicize its name change. As of June 1, the company plans to drop the BF and be known simply as Goodrich.

CHARLOTTE, NC: BF Goodrich will spend up to dollars 3 million this year on a corporate identity program to publicize its name change. As of June 1, the company plans to drop the BF and be known simply as Goodrich.

The change is the culmination of a corporate repositioning. The company no longer makes tires, having sold the BF Goodrich tire brand to Michelin in the 1980s. Today, 84% of its revenues come from selling parts to the aerospace industry.

'We're looking toward our corporate identity program to help audiences understand how this company has changed,' said Kevin Ramundo, VP of corporate communications.

The program began with a VNR sent out on March 5, which was picked up by 27 media outlets, including CNN, CNBC and Bloomberg television. The name change was also discussed in the company's annual report, which was released last week, and a brochure sent to 40,000 customers, employees and shareholders. Its managers will receive a tool kit with tips for discussing the name change with employees; and a new company magazine will help its 23,000 employees in 170 locations learn key business messages.

Advertising will follow PR efforts in late May and employee events are being put together for June 1 to celebrate the new name.

The company's seven-person PR team is handling the program. 'We are executing the program in a thoughtful and cost-effective way,' Ramundo said, adding that the decision to start the program with PR stems from the expectation that there will be generous media interest in the change.

BF Goodrich considered a complete name change, but in the end opted to keep the most recognizable part. 'We know the strength of the name and we wanted to build on that,' Ramundo said.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in