Raytheon vies for Congress' attention

WASHINGTON: Raytheon, already one of the top-five defense contractors in the country, kicked off an effort last week to become the company you think of when you hear the words "homeland security

WASHINGTON: Raytheon, already one of the top-five defense contractors in the country, kicked off an effort last week to become the company you think of when you hear the words "homeland security

- particularly if you happen to be a member of Congress.

A new slogan, "Detect, Protect, and Respond,

was to be put into play at the National Press Club on Thursday, where top Raytheon officials were planning to unveil a host of new products tailored to satisfy that still-undefined need, homeland security. If President Bush's 2003 budget is any indication, government spending on such items will more than double in the coming year.

"Basically, what we've started looking at is what we have across the company that could be applied to what we believe will be the requirements for homeland security,

said Washington media relations director Dave Shea. "Many of the technologies that had existed or had been in development will now migrate or be applied to that."

Among the products to be unveiled is a command-and-control vehicle for use by "first responders

to enhance communication and mobility, as well as detection equipment for hazardous chemicals.

Raytheon's efforts are not limited to the federal level, however. The company is acting on the assumption that state and local governments will also be interested in purchasing such equipment.

All such efforts are being handled by Raytheon's extensive in-house PR team for now, though Shea conceded that the company may eventually need help from outside agencies to take the campaign national.

"We haven't ruled that out,

he explained. "We may need agency support as we go around the country."

See feature, p.15.

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