Media firm ramps up Gore PR team

WASHINGTON, DC: Al Gore’s communications team added critical mass last week with the hiring of media consulting firm Shrum, Devine & Donilon (SD&D).

WASHINGTON, DC: Al Gore’s communications team added critical mass last week with the hiring of media consulting firm Shrum, Devine & Donilon (SD&D).

WASHINGTON, DC: Al Gore’s communications team added critical mass

last week with the hiring of media consulting firm Shrum, Devine &

Donilon (SD&D).



Bob Shrum, Mike Donilon and Tad Devine give the Vice President several

more highly respected voices to call upon for advice. ’This is nothing

but good news for Gore,’ said public affairs consultant Tony May of

Nieman-May. ’He’s got some great minds on his side.’



Each of the three SD&D partners brings something unique to the campaign,

according to May. Donilon is renowned for his ability to frame messages

and interpret polling data, while Devine offers a strong knowledge of

the nomination process from his work on past Democratic presidential

campaigns.



Shrum, on the other hand, brings what BSMG Worldwide president Jack

Leslie calls ’poetry’ to the table. ’He is the most brilliant political

and policy writer I’ve ever met,’ Leslie said. The two previously worked

together as aides to US Sen. Edward Kennedy.



Shrum helped oversee message development for the presidential primary

campaigns of congressmen Richard Gephardt in 1988 and Bob Kerrey in

1992. More recently, he put his talent to work for Israeli Prime

Minister Ehud Barak and Britain’s Labor Party.



Gore’s team already numbers 113, and includes many ’all stars’of

political PR. But it is currently suffering from an affliction common to

VPs seeking the top office: Gore is a known commodity seemingly without

any fresh ideas. While he is staving off all potential Democratic

challengers, Gore is well behind likely Republican nominee George W.

Bush in the polls.



The three SD&D partners have not disclosed their plans for the Gore

campaign, but a possible strategy might borrow from work done on behalf

of Harris Wofford.



Wofford, like Gore, was not considered a populist by background. But

Shrum, Donilon and campaign manager James Carville crafted populist

messages on healthcare, helping Wofford stage an upset victory.



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