IMF taps Edelman for needed media relations revamp

WASHINGTON, DC: The International Monetary Fund is being advised by a PR firm and is looking to beef up its internal communications team, leading observers to believe a PR makeover may be in the works.

WASHINGTON, DC: The International Monetary Fund is being advised by a PR firm and is looking to beef up its internal communications team, leading observers to believe a PR makeover may be in the works.

WASHINGTON, DC: The International Monetary Fund is being advised by

a PR firm and is looking to beef up its internal communications team,

leading observers to believe a PR makeover may be in the works.



Working in conjunction with Edelman, the organization is planning to

overhaul its thorny relationship with the media. The initiative is

reported to have been driven by pressure from the US and Britain, both

big stakeholders in the organization.



Word of the new era of openness comes only weeks after the United

Nations reversed longtime policy by welcoming the media with open arms,

going so far as to suggest that most conversations should be on the

record (PRWeek, Aug. 16).



External affairs director Thomas Dawson will be leading the IMF’s PR

push. He added one deputy last week (Graham Hacche, a career IMF

economist) and is actively looking for another.



While Edelman declined to discuss its relationship with the IMF, Dawson

said the firm has suggested a course of action that involves paying

closer attention to media relations.



’We’re going to be holding regular press briefings every few weeks,’ he

said. ’The feedback for us so far has been extremely positive.’ He

hinted that the attempt to improve communications with external publics

may include more public appearances by IMF chiefs.



The IMF is likely to shed light on its decision-making processes, which

have historically been off-limits to journalists. The process through

which new currencies are approved for troubled economies, for example,

has never been fully explained. The group came under fire last year for

its handling of the Asian financial crisis.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in