Diary: Vote for most effective amateur PR pro of the year

Our vote for most effective amateur PR pro of the year goes to Howard Reid, a cab driver who successfully convinced the state of New York to change a key provision in its lottery laws. Of course, if he hadn’t been so careless in the first place, he never would have gotten the chance to test his PR wiles. Reid claims to have purchased and subsequently lost a winning dollars 7.6 million Lotto ticket from the May 31, 1997 drawing. Receipts indicate that he may well be telling the truth, but until his winning lobbying effort, the state refused to allow anyone not in possession of a ticket to make a claim. Now comes what Reid calls ’the easy part’: pleading his case before the Division of Lottery. Granted, Reid wasn’t alone in his quest - he hired a lawyer and a lobbying advisor - but his two-year battle showcased more ’take it to the limit’ moxie than most agencies boast among their collective staff.

Our vote for most effective amateur PR pro of the year goes to Howard Reid, a cab driver who successfully convinced the state of New York to change a key provision in its lottery laws. Of course, if he hadn’t been so careless in the first place, he never would have gotten the chance to test his PR wiles. Reid claims to have purchased and subsequently lost a winning dollars 7.6 million Lotto ticket from the May 31, 1997 drawing. Receipts indicate that he may well be telling the truth, but until his winning lobbying effort, the state refused to allow anyone not in possession of a ticket to make a claim. Now comes what Reid calls ’the easy part’: pleading his case before the Division of Lottery. Granted, Reid wasn’t alone in his quest - he hired a lawyer and a lobbying advisor - but his two-year battle showcased more ’take it to the limit’ moxie than most agencies boast among their collective staff.

Our vote for most effective amateur PR pro of the year goes to

Howard Reid, a cab driver who successfully convinced the state of New

York to change a key provision in its lottery laws. Of course, if he

hadn’t been so careless in the first place, he never would have gotten

the chance to test his PR wiles. Reid claims to have purchased and

subsequently lost a winning dollars 7.6 million Lotto ticket from the

May 31, 1997 drawing. Receipts indicate that he may well be telling the

truth, but until his winning lobbying effort, the state refused to allow

anyone not in possession of a ticket to make a claim. Now comes what

Reid calls ’the easy part’: pleading his case before the Division of

Lottery. Granted, Reid wasn’t alone in his quest - he hired a lawyer and

a lobbying advisor - but his two-year battle showcased more ’take it to

the limit’ moxie than most agencies boast among their collective staff.



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