Diary: Hold your noses: farts have got PR

Forget Colonel Gadaffi - we’ve found an even tougher PR challenge: representing a client commonly referred to as ’silent but violent.’

Forget Colonel Gadaffi - we’ve found an even tougher PR challenge: representing a client commonly referred to as ’silent but violent.’

Forget Colonel Gadaffi - we’ve found an even tougher PR challenge:

representing a client commonly referred to as ’silent but violent.’



It seems that one facet of a PR plan for better eating includes a push

to convince people that passing gas is good for your health, regardless

of its social consequences.



’Better an empty house than a bad tenant,’ said nutrition consultant

Matt O’Neill.



O’Neill is in New Zealand to promote a national healthy food campaign

run by health agencies. Early reports say that his press conferences

have been sparsely attended, with most attendees hovering near the back

of the room.



O’Neill said that flatulence is such a common male problem that it has

become an icebreaker for men to discuss health issues. ’If you ask

people to count how often they pop off in a day, it would be double

figures,’ he quipped. That’s all? Count for yourself, it’s hours of

fun!



O’Neill also gave some tips to reduce the stink factor. ’If men eat more

fiber, they will be producing a lot of hot air and not much else - it

won’t be as smelly. It’s the beer and steak that make the smelly ones.’



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in