Girl Scouts overhaul ’nice’ image with PR

NEW YORK: The Girl Scouts of the USA, known for little more than cookies, camping and crafts, is about to unveil its first image revamp in years.

NEW YORK: The Girl Scouts of the USA, known for little more than cookies, camping and crafts, is about to unveil its first image revamp in years.

NEW YORK: The Girl Scouts of the USA, known for little more than

cookies, camping and crafts, is about to unveil its first image revamp

in years.



The campaign comes in the wake of a study by New York branding

consultant Siegel & Gale, which conducted interviews with those involved

in the organization as well as outsiders. The firm found that the group

is viewed as ’nice, but not necessary,’ according to director of public

affairs Lori Arguelles.



’We’re so much more than that - we’re a dynamic, cutting-edge

organization, and the largest informal educational organization in the

country,’ she said. ’The study was a real wake-up call.’



Next Wednesday, the group will unveil the results of a survey on how

being a Girl Scout can impact future success and brief magazine editors

on the image revamp. One day later, the group will unveil the first in a

series of PSAs featuring well-known women who were once Girl Scouts -

including Ann Landers, Rebecca Lobo and Martha Stewart - at the National

Press Club in Washington, DC.



’Our key message is that we’re building today’s girls into tomorrow’s

leaders, and that we’re accessible to every girl, everywhere,’ said

Arguelles.



With a new tagline of ’Girl Scouts. Where Girls Grow Strong,’ the group

is redesigning its logo, cookie boxes, letterhead, internal magazine,

handbooks and uniforms. In addition, the organization is trying to

ensure consistency of message among the Girl Scouts’ 318 US

councils.



’People think Girl Scouts just earn sewing badges, but they don’t

realize they’re doing it by sewing quilts for at-risk babies,’ said

Pamela Langone, director of PR for the Girl Scouts of Swift Water

Council, which encompasses New Hampshire and southeastern Vermont.

’We’ve never done a great job at promoting what we do, but this is a

great way to bust out of the stereotype.’



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