MJC enters Boston to tap hi-tech talent pool

BOSTON: Pittsburgh-based Michael James & Company (MJC) has thrown its hat into the crowded Boston hi-tech market.

BOSTON: Pittsburgh-based Michael James & Company (MJC) has thrown its hat into the crowded Boston hi-tech market.

BOSTON: Pittsburgh-based Michael James & Company (MJC) has thrown

its hat into the crowded Boston hi-tech market.



The PR and strategic marketing shop, which officially opened its doors

in Boston in June, announced its entrance into the market last week.

Following a year of planning and recruitment, the agency has lured

four-and-a-half year Brodeur Porter Novelli VP Simon Dibb away from his

post to serve as EVP and general manager of the new office.



According to president Michael Campbell, MJC entered Boston to

capitalize on the hi-tech talent pool, rather than exploit the booming

hi-tech sector.



To fill the Boston leadership post, Campbell contacted current and

former clients in the Boston area for recommendations.



’We had a baker’s dozen of people who were VP-level or above, including

Simon, two SVPs at the biggest agencies in town and one president of the

PR division of an integrated marketing firm,’ said Campbell. ’But Simon

was the one person who captured the essence of our vision and had the

energy level to build the business.’



By the end of the year, Campbell expects the Boston office to provide

approximately 30% of the agency’s overall revenue. He projects overall

agency revenues of as much as dollars 2 million, up from the 1998 sum of

dollars 500,000.



This growth is just the beginning for MJC. According to Campbell, the

agency hopes to open an office in Silicon Valley by December, and plans

on expanding to Washington, DC and Austin as well. MJC has also set its

sights on opening two additional offices in 2001, one

internationally.



While Campbell believes his Boston competition includes Brodeur Porter

Novelli, Weber and Copithorne & Bellows, he said MJC is most similar to

Chen PR, due to its exclusive focus on emerging technology firms and its

inverted pyramid structure, which puts more senior-level execs on

accounts.



’I’ve grown up in the business watching people like Larry Weber and John

Brodeur,’ said Campbell. ’I’d probably get goosebumps if I got to shake

hands with them, but it’s time for a new generation of Brodeurs and

Webers.’



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