Charities create body to regulate fundraising

Growing concern over charities' high street and door-to-door fundraising practices has led to the creation of a regulatory authority.

Growing concern over charities' high street and door-to-door fundraising practices has led to the creation of a regulatory authority.

Fifty leading charities, together with the Institute of Charity Fundraising Managers, have set up the self-regulatory Public Fundraising Regulatory Authority to ensure transparent standards and best practices - so as to 'actively address' an erosion of public trust.

All organisations using cold-calling techniques to ask for direct debit from potential donors are expected to sign-up to the body's Code of Practice on Personal Solicitation, adopted from the ICFM model.

Major names including Oxfam, Barnardo's, Mencap, the NSPCC, Amnesty International and Greenpeace have already signed up.

The PFRA will award a 'kite mark' to charities which adhere to its 'very high' standards of fundraising practice.

PFRA chair, and Mencap head of fundraising and trading, Jo O'Neil said the body would operate a 'name and shame' policy to those organisations which fail to sign-up to the system. 'We will report them to the police and local authorities,' he said.

Asking people in the street or at their doors for direct debit is a growing area of fundraising and has proven successful for some charities, especially in gaining support from younger, non-traditional donors.



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