MEDIA: LBC announces return of Hayes

ITN, which took over the running of LBC radio last year, has strengthened the London station’s line up by bringing back veteran broadcaster Brian Hayes to host a new heavyweight political chat show.

ITN, which took over the running of LBC radio last year, has

strengthened the London station’s line up by bringing back veteran

broadcaster Brian Hayes to host a new heavyweight political chat

show.



Hayes, who last worked at the station nine years ago, is the latest in a

raft of big name signings made by ITN as it attempts to strengthen the

station’s output. Other new presenters include Simon Bates, Alice Beer,

Steve Allen, Peter Deeley and Julia Sommerville.



Hayes will host a two-hour chat show on Sunday mornings. The programme,

Sunday Supplement, will be broadcast from 10am to noon every Sunday from

9 January. It will focus on key London issues, with politicians and

high-profile figures fielding questions from Hayes and the LBC

audience.



’Brian is one of the best radio broadcasters in the country and I’m

delighted that he is coming back to LBC. He will play a major part in

LBC’s new schedule,’ said LBC editor Sue English.



Hayes first made his reputation as a journalistic heavyweight on LBC

over 20 years ago with the mid-morning Brian Hayes Show, which recorded

many notable scoops, including Margaret Thatcher’s first radio phone-in

and interviews with Norman Mailer, Dustin Hoffman and Jack

Nicholson.



The show ran from 1976 to 1991 since when Hayes has continued to work as

a journalist and broadcaster.



Hayes said: ’I’m looking forward to broadcasting for Londoners again. In

the run-up to the establishment of a new London authority, it will be

good talking and listening to the people I meet on the bus and tube

every day.’



LBC was the first commercial radio station to broadcast in the UK in

1973. Audiences dropped in recent years from a peak weekly reach of

632,000 in 1996 to 382,000 in mid-1998. However, audience figures

rallied last year and were up by 9.8 per cent on the year before.



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