What The Papers Say: Murdoch papers lead the anti-Dyke protests

National media opinion on Greg Dyke’s suitability as BBC director general was almost split evenly between those for and those against.

National media opinion on Greg Dyke’s suitability as BBC director

general was almost split evenly between those for and those against.



Initial public opinion was more in favour: two-thirds of those polled in

a weekend omnibus survey agreed that Dyke was the best man for the job,

while just 19 per cent thought his Labour links should disqualify him.

In contrast, nearly half the media messages derided Dyke’s links with

Tony Blair and the Labour Party.



Negative media opinion was volubly led by the Times (’BBC governors have

scripted a tragedy’, 25/6/99). Other broadsheets highlighted the Times’

Murdoch-driven campaign against Dyke bringing his populist touch to the

war for ratings against Sky.



William Hague stepped up his anti-Dyke crusade, drawing reproof from

Tory grandee Ted Heath to the glee of most commentators.



Latterly, the media attempted to drag the Tories down for reportedly

paying a six-figure sum to monitor a year’s worth of BBC output for

bias.



Evaluation supplied by Echo Research. Cuttings supplied by Broadcast

Monitoring Company. This article can also be found at

www.echoResearch.com.



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