What The Papers Say: No allies for champions of modified foods

Genetically-modified (GM) seeds and food continued to receive attention this week. Raisio, the Finnish supplier of Benecol, the margarine that reduces cholesterol, can go straight to a European launch because it doesn’t need EU approval. EU-imposed tests must be conducted on Monsanto’s GM seeds, however, and green groups opposed both seeds and allegedly dangerous environmental tests of seeds.

Genetically-modified (GM) seeds and food continued to receive

attention this week. Raisio, the Finnish supplier of Benecol, the

margarine that reduces cholesterol, can go straight to a European launch

because it doesn’t need EU approval. EU-imposed tests must be conducted

on Monsanto’s GM seeds, however, and green groups opposed both seeds and

allegedly dangerous environmental tests of seeds.



The UK government hinted at abbreviated tests but then switched to a

three-year voluntary moratorium. Monsanto fought this, because EU

permission has legal status. Reporting was mainly negative and Monsanto

was even quoted using the word ’Frankenstein’. The US company had to

cope with an avalanche of criticism almost alone, but such effort was

essential to avoid a sense of conspiracy. Raisio’s vigorous rebuttal of

dangers to health was much easier to communicate. The environmental and

human health case for GM technology would have been stronger with the

results of conclusive experiments.



Evaluation and analysis by CARMA International. Cuttings supplied by the

Broadcast Monitoring Company. ’What the Papers Say’ can be found at:

www.carma.com.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.