CAMPAIGNS: Celebrity names sign up to NSPCC - Charity PR

The Full Stop campaign is the NSPCC’s most ambitious campaign in its 100-year history. The campaign has one simple aim - to end cruelty to children within a generation and enlist every individual and organisation in the country in its efforts.

The Full Stop campaign is the NSPCC’s most ambitious campaign in

its 100-year history. The campaign has one simple aim - to end cruelty

to children within a generation and enlist every individual and

organisation in the country in its efforts.



The campaign was launched with a television advertisement on 16

March.



Objectives



To maximise positive coverage of the launch over a two-week period. To

support marketing activity, such as the national door-drop of the pledge

and the advertising campaign.



Tactics



The first part of the campaign was the desk launch of the Full Stop

campaign, timed to coincide with the start of TV advertising - a series

of chilling advertisements highlighting the ways children are

abused.



This story concentrated on the serious messages about the aim of the

campaign, and the engagement with Government, private sector, voluntary

and statutory agencies in a bid to end child cruelty.



Five days before the launch, a press pack was mailed to the media with

an embargo until 15 March. Special press releases were also sent to

journalists working in areas such as black, Asian and youth media.



Journalists and columnists were invited to personal briefings prior to

the launch, and key NSPCC personnel were made available for broadcast

interviews to be recorded in advance. Tapes of the advertisement were

also sent to the broadcast media.



The second story given to the media coincided with the appeal launch a

week later. Taking a more light-hearted approach, this concentrated on

the appeal - not for money, but for signatures pledging support. Among

the first to sign were Prince Andrew, Tony Blair, Cilla Black and Baby

Spice Emma Bunton, who also appeared in a celebrity photocall.



Further photocalls were arranged, featuring the England football team

two days before they played against Poland, and Sarah Ferguson, Prince

Andrew and their daughters.



Results



In the national newspapers alone, there were 67 pieces of coverage

during the launch period, including features, news stories, letters to

the editor, photographs in news and sports pages, opinion columns and

features in special sections like the Guardian Media supplement.



Broadcast coverage was also widespread. The BBC, for example, covered it

from the Today programme in the morning to the Nine O’Clock News in the

evening. GMTV interviewed Emma Bunton and did two live broadcasts from

NSPCC National Centre. ITV and Sky TV both featured on-air pledge

signing.



There was also mass support from the regional media.



Verdict



Who could have failed to be aware of the NSPCC campaign? With overall

supportive coverage, the idea of engaging with all sectors of society

has been undeniably effective.



The two stages worked well, with the serious message of the first stage

being followed up with a positive ’you can help’ message in the

second.



Client: NSPCC.

PR Teams: NSPCC media office, supported by Saatchi and Saatchi, Hobsbawm

Macaulay, Shandwick and regional agencies.

Campaign: NSPCC Full Stop campaign and appeal.

Timescale: March 1999.

Budget: Undisclosed.



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