What The Papers Say: Giving voters what they don’t really want

Content analysis is being used more and more to look for cause and effect in determining how the media affects public opinion. In this case, we are looking at whether the issues that the public say are determining their voting intention, as measured by the MORI/Times poll taken on 8 April, are reflected in the amount of coverage achieved by the two main parties in the same week.

Content analysis is being used more and more to look for cause and

effect in determining how the media affects public opinion. In this

case, we are looking at whether the issues that the public say are

determining their voting intention, as measured by the MORI/Times poll

taken on 8 April, are reflected in the amount of coverage achieved by

the two main parties in the same week.



Leaving aside sleaze, our analysis shows that taxation and the economy

were the two other dominant issues for Labour and Conservative

respectively.



However, issues that voters regarded as important were: healthcare,

education and law and order.



As of 11 April, only Labour was giving any of these prominence

(education).



Housing, mentioned by nearly a quarter of MORI’s respondents, was

largely being overlooked by both parties in terms of issues driving

coverage in the national press. Europe, by contrast, was also mentioned

by 22 per cent of the poll and yet accounted for a fairly high

proportion of coverage.



Evaluation and analysis by Carma International.



Additional cuttings supplied by the Broadcast Monitoring Company. ’What

The Papers Say’ can also be found at: http//www.carma.com/carma.



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