COMMENT: EDITORIAL; Gambling with public goodwill

The National Lottery is a game of chance with ludicrously high odds against any one person winning the jackpot. The punters understand this but treat it as a bit of fun, with the added feel good factor of the worthy causes their failed bets will help support.

The National Lottery is a game of chance with ludicrously high odds

against any one person winning the jackpot. The punters understand this

but treat it as a bit of fun, with the added feel good factor of the

worthy causes their failed bets will help support.



The decision to amend the ‘pounds 10 for three numbers’ rule has been a

media relations disaster for Camelot (What the Papers Say, p6) because

it broke the first rule of PR by leaving a yawning chasm between what

the company says and what it does.



Camelot’s marketing tries to persuade people it is worth spending money

on the minute chance of winning the jackpot. There is therefore an

appalling incongruity in this vastly profitable organisation trying to

avoid a similarly minute chance of taking any financial risk itself.



Yet another business decision has been taken which ignores the obvious

PR consequences.



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