Interim remedy for Greenpeace

Greenpeace International (GPI) has appointed an interim communications director to run its PR division in Amsterdam while it renews its search for someone to fill the position permanently.

Greenpeace International (GPI) has appointed an interim

communications director to run its PR division in Amsterdam while it

renews its search for someone to fill the position permanently.



Brian Fitzgerald, special projects director at GPI, is the second person

to fill the post on a temporary basis.



He takes over from human resources director Gabrielle Lauermann who has

been heading up the communications division since August last year when

the unit relocated to the Netherlands.



Richard Titchen previously held the position when the global

communications unit was based in London, but he quit the organisation

rather than relocate.



GPI has to advertise the post again next week as so far it has not found

any candidates that fit the brief. The right candidate will need to have

international experience and be able to manage a 20-strong PR team. He

or she will also liaise with PR chiefs in the 32 Greenpeace offices

worldwide.



Meanwhile Greenpeace’s UK office is restructuring its press

department.



The role of media manager, which was filled by Adam Woolf until he left

to take a career break two weeks ago, has been upgraded to media

director.



’This is so that media gets represented at a senior management level for

the first time,’ said a Greenpeace spokesperson. In the meantime,

Woolf’s responsibilities are being taken on by press officer Mirella

Lindenfels.



The changes coincide with a new report commissioned by Greenpeace from

Opinion Leader Research, which reveals a change in the role of the

campaigning group. According to the report its role is ’no longer about

simply raising public awareness as in the 1980s. It is also about

offering solutions’.



The report goes on to say that campaigners have to recognise people’s

inability to relate to global, abstract issues and calls for some

modification of language and refocus on ’symbolic’ solutions.



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