ANALYSIS: THIS WEEK’S BIG QUESTION - Should gay ministers be open about their sexuality?

Speculation over ministers’ sexuality has recently filled the media.

Speculation over ministers’ sexuality has recently filled the

media.



DAVID ALLISON - OutRage



’Yes, I think they should in that sexuality is an issue at the

moment.



The more open they are about it the more they represent a role model for

other people. Being openly gay does not damage your parliamentary

career.



People judge you on the job you do. Heterosexual MPs make no secret of

their sexuality - they even use photos of their wives and children in

party literature.’



JACK IRVINE - Media House International



’It’s their own business and if they don’t frighten the horses why

worry. However, if they lie to their partners or spend their evenings

cruising for action then we as their paymasters have a right to know and

the press have a right, and a duty, to expose them. If people are rats

in their private life they’ll have little compunction about being rats

in their public life.’



DAVID HUDSON - Boyz Magazine



’Someone’s sexuality is irrelevant to the job they hold and I’m sure

many use this as an excuse to ’stay in the closet’. However, I think gay

MPs should be open about their sexuality. Attitudes have changed and the

general public are much more accepting of alternative lifestyles. I

think they actually have more respect for a politician that they feel is

honest, as opposed to one that they find out has been hiding something

from them.’



PATRICK ROBERTSON - Robertson and Associates



’The problem with Ron Davies type scandals is that they could involve

him and the Government in blackmail and having tried to cover up the

Davies affair, less people are likely to believe the Government’s

version of Nick Brown’s outing. The Government’s lack of honesty at the

outset will make life more difficult for every homosexual in the

Government.’



KEVIN REDFERN - Slam



’It should be entirely left with the minister. One should be open in the

arenas one desires. But when being open at work requires being open in

the wider public arena, the issues become more complex. Some people are

fortunate. Their families couldn’t be more supportive. Everyone should

be open about who they are, but if honesty equates to the loss of loved

ones, who are we to judge?’



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