DIARY: Brute force comes to the fore in fight for podium

City Profile PR stepped back into childhood last week and got the Scalextric out for teams of analysts, bankers and financial journalists to compete in its so-called City challenge.

City Profile PR stepped back into childhood last week and got the

Scalextric out for teams of analysts, bankers and financial journalists

to compete in its so-called City challenge.



City Profile has worked for Scalextric-owner Hornby Hobbies for ten

years but still had to rent the track. Plus, an unfortunately timed

analyst lunch in City Profile’s office in between races meant the team

had to spend two hours disassembling it and another two setting it back

up. But the effort was rewarded with an enthusiastic response. Perhaps

too enthusiastic.



’It got quite tense one night. Two teams came close to fisticuffs,’ said

City Profile managing director Jonathan Gillen, tactfully declining to

name the companies involved.



Professional ethics aside, Gillen’s diplomacy may have more to do with

self-preservation. Both teams involved made it through to this week’s

final. And Gillen is the challenge’s senior umpire.



The shortlist of closet chest-beaters includes the Financial Times, a

Bloomberg/Investors Chronicle team, Williams de Broe, ABN Amro, BT, Alex

Brown and Beeston Gregory.



City Profile, perhaps taking a lead from their tactful MD, managed to

come last in every heat. Chief receptionist Sophie Rossell put in the

best performance, despite failing her driving test last month.



But it’s more likely the City image-builders were less adept at the

British Rail-style sabotage techniques of dropping peanuts and dangling

ties on the track employed by the other competitors.



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