MEDIA: What the Papers say; Media is easy prey for the Hawk vandals

Analysis of coverage of the trial of four ‘direct action’ protesters who vandalised a Hawk Jet at a British Aerospace factory illustrates how the defendants managed to hijack the media in the subsequent days. In terms of reaching the greatest number of people, the protesters utilised both TV and the national press efficiently. Their tactics however were widely criticised as ‘undermining both democracy and ethical politics’ (Sunday Telegraph).

Analysis of coverage of the trial of four ‘direct action’ protesters who

vandalised a Hawk Jet at a British Aerospace factory illustrates how the

defendants managed to hijack the media in the subsequent days. In terms

of reaching the greatest number of people, the protesters utilised both

TV and the national press efficiently. Their tactics however were widely

criticised as ‘undermining both democracy and ethical politics’

(Sunday Telegraph).



BAe put out a standard reactive statement expressing surprise at the not

guilty verdicts and insisted that BAe had no evidence that their

aircraft were being used against civilians in East Timor. Their local

MP, Michael Jacks, also issued supportive statements to the press.



Commentators included Geoffrey Robertson QC who said the verdict would

send a signal to the Government about arms sales and human rights and

legal affairs expert Marcel Berlin who denied that the judgment would

set a legal precedent.



Evaluation and analysis by Carma International. Cuttings supplied by

The Broadcast Monitoring Company. ‘What The Papers Say’ can also be

found at: http//www.carma.com/carma



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